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British Royal Navy Daring class Destroyer
(Type 45 - Batches Two & Three):


At the dawn the Twentieth-First Century the British Royal Navy was urgently in need of a replacement for their aging Type 42 air defense destroyers. While good warships in their day, their age was showing with them unable to deal with emerging threats. By modern standards, these destroyers were also small, not much larger than many frigates entering service.


During the Nineteen-Eighties, the British Navy had been working with seven other NATO nations to develop a replacement for the Type 42 air defense destroyers under the NFR-90 project. Unfortunately, the program collapsed due to the fact that various nations had different requirements for their navies. The United States was a partner and did not like the idea of a single mission design and ultimately went with the Arleigh Burke class destroyers, a large multi-role vessel. Many of the other nations were pushing smaller frigate type designs, something that the British Navy did not think could fulfil their needs. Finally, France was pushing for the adoption of their Exocet missile while most nations preferred the American Harpoon missile.


Why, after having so many problems with France already with the NFR-90 project, Great Britain teamed up with France, along with Italy, for the Horizon project is pretty hard to understand. Of course the hope was that such a project would result in costs going down, a large commonality of parts, and better cooperation between the nations involved. It was also hoped that the design would be delivered on time.


From the beginning, there were issues. The project suffered numerous delays. Of course France insisted on their own priorities even though they planned to built far fewer vessels than Great Britain. A major problem was that while France and Italy were only looking at a design with relatively short range air defenses, the Royal Navy wanted a design with far better long range defenses. Ultimately, Great Britain pulled out of the Horizon project in April of 1999. France and Italy continued on and eventually constructed a pair of Horizon type frigates each after several more years of delays.


By now the need to develop a replacement for the Type 42 destroyer had become critical. Deciding to open up the design, the Royal Navy gave out the basic requirement and defense companies were expected to present their own designs as possible contenders. One of these was the design from BAE systems. It was presented less than eighteen months after the design requirements had been presented. This design became the Type 45 class destroyer, also called the “Daring” class.


Already by the middle of the year 2000, the British Ministry of Defense ordered the first batch of three ships out of a total of twelve. The first steel for these destroyers was cut in 2003. Now there were a number of delays as well as cost overruns during the program, especially with the first batch of these destroyers. Still, the Royal Navy could finally begin retiring their Type 42 destroyers.


While not anywhere near as large as the American Arleigh Burke class destroyers, the Daring class were quite large vessels, far larger than the Type 42 class destroyers that they were replacing. Unlike previous British destroyer classes, the Daring class was designed with a reduced radar cross signature. With an eye towards further upgrades, these destroyers have plenty of available space for new systems. Once some initial issues were worked out, the Type 45 destroyers were considered quite reliable vessels.


In the past, there had been designs of vessels using electric-drive. The Daring class was designed with the then revolutionary Integrated Electrical Propulsion, using alternating current to provide all of the needs of the vessels where previous electric-drive had used direct current for propulsion and generally had separate alternating current for the vessel’s other requirements. One item that people often remarked about were the electrical induction motors driving the propellers. They were huge, weighing about one hundred tons each. A pair of WR21 Rolls Royce gas turbines provided power for the vessel.


As described previously, one of the major issues with French and Italian design was the relatively limited abilities of the EMPAR radar systems under consideration. As a result, the Type 1045 Sampson active phased array radar was developed in order to give adequate tracking capabilities. In addition, the Type 45 destroyer mounted the long range Marconi/Signaal S1850M phased array surface/air search radar. Combining both systems together and integrating them with the weapon system was a fire control system known as PAAMS (Principle Anti Air Missile System).


One issue that has sometimes been raised with this class is the lack of a towed array sonar. Even though air defense is its primary role, having a towed array would greatly enhance the ability of the destroyer to deal with underwater threats. However, it did mount the Ferranti/Thomson Sintra Type 2050 sonar under the bow. In addition, these destroyers were designed with a large single place hanger for the Merlin ASW helicopter.


This is not to say that there were not criticisms of the design. One of the more serious ones was that the weaponry as built can be considered marginal, especially with respect to batch one of these destroyers. Weaponry consisted of a Vickers 4.5 inch gun, a comparatively inefficient forty-eight cell Sylver A-50 vertical launch system, a pair of manually aimed 30 mm cannons, four 324 mm torpedo tubes, and finally a pair of Phalanx 20 mm CIWS mounts. Batch two and three were improved with larger Mk 41 vertical launch systems, improved CIWS mounts, and the Storm Shadow surface to surface missile for anti-ship use.


As time went on, it was decided that the first batch of Type 45 destroyers was not worth the cost of upgrading them. This more of less coincided with the revolution in super strong materials and these destroyers would also require rebuilding with the new advanced materials. During the Twenty-Thirties, all three batch one destroyers were sold to Canada.


Still, it was decided to retain the second and third batches of these destroyers and upgrade them. Just after the three destroyers in the first batch were transferred to Canada, one of the Type 45 destroyers remaining in British service was in an at sea collision and suffered a massive fire that meant that the destroyer was not considered economical to repair. As a result, only eight Daring class destroyers remained to be upgraded. Newer vessels such as the Audacious class frigates were also considered a priority for rebuilding and so the rebuilding of the Type 45 destroyers was delayed.


As it was, the Daring class batch two and three vessels that the Royal Navy retained already had some considerable improvements over the batch one ships. Most significant was that the batch two and three vessels had the inefficient French forty-eight cell Sylver A-50 vertical launch system replaced by the more efficient American 48 cell strike length Mk 41 launch system. While the second batch still featured the Phalanx 20 mm CIWS mounts, but the third batch replaced the original mount with the SeaRAM weapon system that fired the RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM). Even though a 155 mm gun mount had been developed using the same mounting at the 4.5 inch gun, the older weapon system was retained having already been ordered prior to the destroyers being laid down.


During the major refit where these vessels had new composite and alloy armor added, they also had major upgrades to their weapon systems. Of course all of the weapon systems were adapted to be able to fire the new missile and use the new ordnance developed around the same time as the new advanced materials.


Instead of refitting these destroyers with the 155 mm gun mount that was original developed for them, a new longer ranged electro-thermal mounting replaced the 4.5 inch gun mount. The conventional 155 mm gun mount was however used on the Audacious class frigates as there was not enough space to mount the larger electro-thermal mounting. The 155 mm gun mount was considered far more effective with naval gunfire missions than the original 4.5 inch gun mounts.


Also during the refit, the original Phalanx 20 mm CIWS and SeaRAM mounts were replaced by the new American Mk 44 “Sea Sabre” combination point defense weapon mounts. Mounted in the same positions, these new weapon mounts combined a powerful rail gun with a short range missile battery, effectively combining the best aspect of both weapon systems. These new mounts were also designed to have a lower radar cross signature than the original mounts and featured their own short range active phased array tracking system.


An final important improvement with the weapon systems was that behind the forward Mk 41lucnh system, a second Mk 41 launch system was placed although with only sixteen cells. This meant that the raised portion of the deck had to be extended to the rear, and that the two quadruple sea skimming missile launchers had to be moved amidships, between the masts. Unlike the larger Mk 41 launcher, this launcher was intended to hold surface to air missiles only, and freed space in the larger launcher for cruise missiles.


Together with the installment of the second Mk 41 launcher, most of the command and control facilities on these ships were removed. Since the new Hood class destroyers/cruisers were being taken into service, it was deemed unnecessary for the remaining Daring class destroyers to carry such expensive equipment.


The later ships being refitted also had their original gas turbines replaced by fusions turbines during their reconstruction. This was later back fitted to the rest of the class. Even though an expensive refit, fusion turbines would quickly result in cost saving in terms of fuel. As with Canada and the batch one Daring class destroyers, it was decided to put a limiter on the fusion turbines so that they would not damage the rest of the propulsion system.


As more and more of the Hood class cruisers entered service the remaining Daring class destroyers were placed in active reserve. In that function they lasted for several decades. Several of them were later cannibalized to allow the remainder to remain in service. When of the Third Falklands War occurred, there were only three remaining in service. By this time, the Type 45 destroyers almost three times their intended life span.


Of the Daring class destroyers remaining in service, H.M.S. Diana was returning from a training patrol from the Falklands when the war occurred. A batch three vessel, she had been actually the last Type 45 destroyer completed. Just a few days prior to the nuclear assault, she had met with the task force in order to take onboard some fresh supplies. At the time of the attack she was still less than 150 miles removed from the task force. When the South American Sea Triangle activated, H.M.S. Diana was also flung into the future.


Author Note: With respect to time line, these designs may or may not reflect our modern time line. The time line of these writeups diverged from our time line starting around 1999. Consider the universe that these designs are created for to be an alternate universe not bound by ours.


Model Type: Type 45 Daring Class.

Class: Air Defense Missile Destroyer

Crew: 180 personnel; 18 officers, 18 chief petty officers, and 144 enlisted.

Troops: 8 Merlin crew members and berthing for 70 marines.


Vehicle Compliment:

 

1

Westland Merlin HM 1 helicopter.


M.D.C. by Location:

 

BAE Systems 155 mm (6.1 inch)/65 Mk 3 Electro-Thermal Gun Barrel (1, mount):

100.

 

BAE Systems 155 mm (6.1 inch)/62 Mk 3 Electro-Thermal Gun Mount (1, forward):

250.

 

Mk 44 “Sea Sabre” Combination Anti-Missile System (2, superstructure):

200 each.

 

30mm Mark 44 Bushmaster II Auto Cannon Mounts (2, superstructure):

50 each.

 

Mk 41 Strike Length 48 Cell Vertical Launcher System (1, forward):

360.

 

Mk 41 Tactical Length 16 Cell Vertical Launch System (1, amidships):

160.

 

Mk 141 Missile Canisters (8 total, superstructure):

100 each.

 

Dual 12.75 inch (324 mm) Cray Marine Medium Torpedo Tubes (2, sides):

35 each.

 

[1] Type 1045 Sampson Active Phased Array Radar System (superstructure):

250.

 

[1] Marconi/Signaal S1850M Air/Surf. Search Radar (superstructure):

180.

 

[2] Sea Gnat Chaff / Decoy Launchers (4, superstructure):

10 each.

 

Hangar (aft):

280.

 

VTOL Pad (aft):

180.

 

Bridge:

350.

 

Outer Hull (per 40 foot / 12.2 meter area):

60.

 

[3] Main Body:

1,450


Notes:

[1] Destroying both the Type 1045 Sampson rotating active phased array radar system and the S1850M air / surface search radar system will destroy the ship’s main long range fire control and tracking systems but the vessel has backup systems with a shorter range (Equal to robot vehicle sensors.)

[2] These are small and difficult targets to strike, requiring the attacker to make a “called shot,” but even then the attacker is -4 to strike.

[3] Depleting the M.D.C. of the main body destroys the ship’s structural integrity, causing it to sink. There are enough flotation devices and inflatable life rafts to accommodate everyone aboard.


Speed:

On Water: 33.9 mph (29.5 knots / 54.6 kph).

Range: As Built: 9,206 miles (8,000 nautical miles / 14,766 km) at 18 knots (20.7 mph/ 33.3 kph).

As Refitted (with Fusion Turbines): Effective unlimited due to fusion engines (needs to refuel every 20 years and requires maintenance as well). Ship carries a maximum of six (6) months of supplies on board.


Statistical Data:

Draft: 16 feet (4.8 meters)

Width: 66.7 feet (20 meters)

Length:  474.3 feet (144.3 meters) waterline and 503.3 feet (151 meters).

Displacement: 5,800 tons standard and 7,200 tons fully loaded.

Cargo: Can carry 400 tons (369.9 metric tons) of nonessential equipment and supplies. Each enlisted crew member had a small locker for personal items and uniforms, and junior ratings were housed in six berth cabins, with senior ratings sharing two berth cabins. Ship’s officers had far more space for personal items, and lived in individual cabins. Most of the ship’s spaces are taken up by extra ammo, armor, troops, weapons, and engines.

Power System:

As Built: Two WR21 Rolls Royce Gas Turbine Generator sets and two Rolls Royce electric induction motors. The ship has a total of 40MW of power for the motors (54,000 shp) and the ship has two shafts.

As Refitted: Two WR23 Rolls Royce Nuclear Turbine Generator sets and two Rolls Royce electric induction motors. The ship has a total of 40MW of power for the motors (54,000 shp) and the ship has two shafts.

Black Market Price: Not for sale but if found on the black market would probably cost 200 million or more credits. Cost does not include embarked craft and power armors.


Weapon Systems:

  1. One (1) BAE Systems 155 mm (6.1 inch)/65 Mk 3 Electro-Thermal Naval Gun: Replaces original 4.5 mm naval gun. Mounted in the bow of the destroyer. While there was also a 155 mm gun designed to use standard artillery shells, later fitted to the Audacious class frigate, this is an upgraded version that is an electro-thermal design and longer ranged. The projectile is loaded into the barrel, behind which there is a “propellant,” which is a dot of light metal. A powerful electromagnetic force is applied to the metal, which causes its atoms to “switch” directions. This happens so violently that the metal turns to plasma, and this expanding gas then drives the projectile forward. The reload system is fully automated and the rate of fire can be maintained as long as the system retains ammunition. While the projectiles has a lot greater range than standard 155 mm projectiles, they carry the same size warheads and inflicts about the same damage. Self Guided projectiles can be used for pinpoint accuracy although G.P.S. Satellite guided projectiles are no longer useful due to the elimination of the satellites. Guided projectiles are far more expensive. Both non rocket assisted and rocket assisted projectiles are available for the weapon system. Weapon is not designed to use Extended range Guided Munitions and they were not seen as necessary with the great range of the electro-thermal projectiles. The gun mount can rotate 270 and has a 60 arc of fire.

    Maximum Effective Range: 31.1 miles (27 nautical miles / 50 km) for standard projectiles, and 49.7 miles (43.2 nautical miles / 80.0 km) for rocket assisted projectiles.

    Mega-Damage: Standard Projectiles: 2D6x10 to a blast radius of 25 feet (7.7 meters) for High Explosive, 3D6x10 to a blast radius of 6 feet (2 meters) for High Explosive Armor Piercing, and 4D6x10 to a blast radius of 25 feet (7.7 meters) for Plasma. Rocket Assisted Projectiles: 2D4x10 to a blast radius of 20 feet (6.1 meters) for High Explosive, 2D6x10 to a blast radius of 4 feet (1.2 meters) for High Explosive Armor Piercing, and 3D6x10 to a blast radius of 20 feet (6.1 meters) for Plasma.

    Use the statistics for 155 mm artillery warheads (Go to Battlefield Artillery for Rifts for more information - standard or rocket assisted as appropriate) when using artillery rounds.

    Rate of Fire: Up to four (4) single shots per melee round.

    Payload: 600 rounds total.

  2. Two (2) 30mm Mk 44 Bushmaster II Auto Cannon Mounts: Two 30 mm cannons were mounted on the sides of the superstructure, one on each side. These weapons had a good range and rate of fire, but lacked the punch to do damage to large targets. Since they were manually aimed, they were little good against missiles, and the crew often joked that they were only good for “Shooting life boats and survivors in the water.” Primarily however, they are for defense against small boats and similar threats. Each gun can rotate 270 degrees and has a 90 degree arc of fire.

    Maximum Effective Range: 10,000 feet (3,048 meters).

    Mega-Damage: 2D6 per round, and 1D6x10 for a burst of 30 rounds.

    Rate of Fire: Equal to the combined hand to hand attacks of the gunner (usually 4 or 5).

    Payload: 600 rounds (20 bursts) each. Ship carries an additional 12,000 rounds of ammunition in magazines. Auto cannons requires 3 minutes (12 melees) to reload by properly trained personnel (Double for untrained crews.)

  3. Two (2) Mk 44 “Sea Sabre” Combination Anti-Missile Defense Systems: Replace original SeaRAM mounts. Bought from the United States as a replacement for aging defense system. Mounted on the sides of the superstructure. This anti-missile defense system combines both a rapid fire rail gun and a short range missile launcher. While mounted in one system, both defense systems have separate tracking and fire control systems. The short range missile launchers can target up four targets and can fire a volley up to twice per melee. Quite powerful, the rail gun is capable of destroying any missile or inflicting serious damage on aircraft. The rail gun can fire on automatic at up to six targets per melee (Has +3 to strike missiles and +2 to strike aircraft). In its design, the rail gun is very similar to those carried on the Sea King cruiser and it is likely that the Sea King’s rail guns came from a prototype of this system. The system also can be used against other ships and ground targets. The system has a 360 degree rotation and can elevate up to 90 degrees to fire at targets directly overhead.

    Maximum Effective Range: Rail Guns: 11,000 feet (2 miles / 3.2 km). Short Range Missiles: As per short range missile type (See revised bomb and missile tables for details.)

    Mega-Damage: Rail Guns: 3D4x10 M.D. per burst of 40 rounds (Can only fire bursts). Short Range Missiles: As per short range missile type (See revised bomb and missile tables for details.)

    Rate of Fire: Rail Guns: Six (6) attacks per melee round. Short Range Missiles: Two (2) attacks per melee round, can fire short range missiles one at a time or in volleys of two (2) or four (4) short range missiles.

    Payload: Rail Guns: 8,000 rounds (200 burst) each. Short Range Missiles: Sixteen (16) short range missiles each.

  4. One (1) Mk 41 Strike Length 48 Cell Vertical Launch System: Mounted behind the 155 mm gun mount on a raised platform, this forward launcher has 48 cells able to fire a variety of missiles. An American design which was much more flexible than the French Sylver A-50 launcher, the slightly larger cells allowed for two long range missiles or four medium range missiles to be loaded into one cell. It also provided a better rate of fire. As these are the longer strike version of the missile launcher, they can carry the longer cruise missile. From the beginning, the launchers have been found to be very flexible and adaptable. The launcher was originally design for the Tomahawk and Standard SM-2 Missile. In later service,, these launchers have been adapted to hold one cruise missile, two long range missiles, or four medium range missiles per cell. Cruise missiles are usually used against hardened fixed targets, long range missiles are normally used against aircraft and other large targets, and medium range missiles are normally used against closer targets such as incoming missiles. Anti-Submarine rocket launched torpedoes also can be fired from the launcher (See revised Rifts torpedoes for details.) On the Daring class these missiles cells carried long range missiles and the hypersonic Fasthawk cruise missile for surface to surface engagements and land attack roles.

    Maximum Effective Range: As per cruise, long range, or medium range missile type (See revised bomb and missile tables for details / for Fasthawk missiles, go to missile description for details.)

    Mega-Damage: As per cruise, long range, or medium range missile type (See revised bomb and missile tables for details / for Fasthawk missiles, go to missile description for details.)

    Rate of Fire: Can fire missiles one at a time or in volleys of two (2), four (4), sixteen (16), or twenty-four (24) missiles for both launchers per melee and can be fired at multiple targets at the same time.

    Payload: Forty-eight (48) cells for missiles in forward VLS launcher (possible total of 96 long range missiles). One (1) cruise missile, two (2) long range missiles, or four (4) medium range missiles may be carried per cell. Ship carries no reloads.

  5. One (1) Mk 41 Tactical Length 16 Cell Vertical Launch System: Mounted during a later upgrade and was located behind the main 48 cell Mk 41 vertical launch system. An American design which was much more flexible than the French Sylver A-50 launcher, the slightly larger cells allowed for two long range missiles or four medium range missiles to be loaded into one cell. It also provided a better rate of fire. The tactical length version could not carry cruise missiles and used almost exclusively to house surface to air missiles. From the beginning, the launchers have been found to be very flexible and adaptable and the launcher can carry two long range missiles or four medium range missiles per cell. Anti-Submarine rocket launched torpedoes also can be fired from the launcher (See revised Rifts torpedoes for details.)

    Maximum Effective Range: As per long or medium range missile type (See revised bomb and missile tables for details.)

    Mega-Damage: As per long or medium range missile type (See revised bomb and missile tables for details.)

    Rate of Fire: Can fire missiles one at a time or in volley of two (2), four (4), or eight (8) missiles for launcher per melee and can be fired at multiple targets at the same time.

    Payload: Sixteen (16) missiles cells in VLS launcher (possible total of 32 long range missiles.) Two (2) long range missiles or four (4) medium range missiles may be carried per missile cell. Ship carries no reloads.

  6. Eight (8) Mk 141 Long Range Missile Canister Launchers: These launchers are special canisters mounted in two quadruple mounts behind the main mast. They mount on the deck of the vessel and are effectively bolted on. While the launchers are reusable, they are still inexpensive and are easily jettisoned if damaged. Originally designed for the RGM-84 Harpoon missile but adapted for a larger variety of ordnance. While any long range missile type can be carried, usually special surface skimming missiles will be carried in launchers and are used against surface targets only.

    Maximum Effective Range: As per long range missile type (Surface skimming missiles have 25% less range than normal long range missiles, see revised bomb and missile tables for details.)

    Mega Damage: As per long range missile type (See revised bomb and missile tables for details.)

    Rate of Fire: Can fire long range missiles one at a time or in volleys of two (2), four (4), or eight (8) long range missiles with all launchers operating together.

    Payload: One (1) long range missile each launcher for a grand total of eight (8) long range missiles (Has no missiles in storage for reloads.)

  7. Two (2) Dual 12.75 inch (324 mm) Cray Marine Medium Torpedo Tubes: There is one twin launcher on each side of the ship. Each twin torpedo launcher has two torpedo tubes and tubes are 12.75 in (324 mm) wide. Torpedoes are normally used against submarines but can be targeted against surface targets as well. Interceptor torpedoes are also available for launchers / tubes to use against incoming torpedoes. Ship carries 40 reloads for torpedoes. For the most part torpedo warheads are equal to medium range missile warheads.

    Maximum Effective Range: 20 miles (17.4 nautical miles / 32 km).

    Mega-Damage: By medium torpedo warhead type (See revised Rifts torpedoes for details.)

    Rate of Fire: Can fire medium torpedoes one at a time or in volleys of two (2) medium torpedoes per side. Reloading tubes requires two (2) full melee rounds.

    Payload: Two (2) medium torpedoes each launcher for a grand total of four (4) medium torpedoes. Has an additional forty (40) medium torpedoes for reloads.

  8. Four (4) Sea Gnat Chaff / Decoy Launcher: Located on the superstructure of the ship, they are designed to confuse incoming missiles. All four launchers must be operated or effects will be reduced. Rifts Earth decoys systems are assumed to not be effective against Phase World / Three Galaxies missiles due to technological difference. Reduce effects by 20% against smart missiles (Add +20% to rolls for smart missiles) and reduce effects of launchers by 10% per launcher not used (Add +10% to rolls per launcher not used.) Only useful against missiles, not useful against torpedoes underwater.

    Range: Around Ship.

    Mega Damage: None.

    Effects:

    01-35

    Enemy missile or missile volley detonates in chaff cloud - Missiles are all destroyed.

     

    36-60

    Enemy missile or missile volley loses track of real target and veers away in wrong direction (May lock onto another target.)

     

    61-00

    No effect, enemy missile or missile volley is still on target.

    Payload: Six (6) each for a total of twenty-four (24) canisters. Ninety-six (96) reload canisters are carried, reloading takes two melee rounds.

  9. Four (4) SLQ-25F Nixie Towed Decoys: A special decoy which is towed behind the ship. The Coalition has not seen a need for this system so has not equipped their ships with it. It generates a sound like the ships propellers in order to confuse incoming torpedoes. Only effective at speeds 28.8 mph (25 knots / 46.3 kph) and below. Otherwise, the noise of the ship’s systems and propellers is too powerful to mask. Rifts Earth decoys systems are assumed to not be effective against Phase World / Three Galaxies guidance and targeting systems due to technological differences.

    M.D.C.: 5 each.

    Range: Not Applicable although decoy is deployed approximately 1,000 feet (304.8 meters) from the vessel.

    Effects: The decoy has a 65% chance of fooling ordinary non military sonars and non smart guided torpedoes, the decoy has a 35% chance of fooling military level sonars (like those of the Coalition) and non “smart” torpedoes, and the decoy has a 10% chance of fooling advanced military sonars (Like those of the New Navy and Triax) and “smart” torpedoes.

    Payload: One ready to use, with three more ready to deploy. It takes approximately three minutes (twelve melee rounds) to reel out another decoy.

Special Systems:.



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Writeup by Mischa (E-Mail Mischa) and revised by Kitsune (E-Mail Kitsune).


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